Video: CBD- What You Need to Know

CBD, or cannabidiol, is a heath enhancing phytonutrient that comes from the Hemp plant. Although its been used for decades, it has only become a well accepted treatment for a number of health condition over the last 5 to 10 years. Because of numerous research studies, and the support from Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Dr. Mehmet Oz CBD is widely used for pain, inflammation, anxiety, insomnia, epilepsy, cancer, nausea, heart disease, opioid addiction, behavioral challenges in severe autism, and more.

CBD supplements come in either a tincture that goes under the tongue or in gel cap form. When buying a CBD supplement you must make sure it fulfills the following 5 requirements;

1.Organic 2. GMO Free 3. THC Free 4. Full Spectrum 5. Independently Lab Tested for Quality & Quantity

How much CBD you take depends on two factors- body size and severity of condition. Here is a simple guideline to follow;

100lbs-175lbs: 15mg to 25 mg (severe condition add a bit more)

175lbs-250+lbs: 25mg to 50mg (severe conditions 30mg twice per day)

If you or someone you love suffers from one of the conditions above, or you have questions about whether CBD can help you give us a call. (201)670-7661

Video: Simple Exercises to Strengthen the Legs & Butt

Lower extremity strength and endurance is vital to our overall physical health and independence ensuring that both will be preserved as we approach the golden years.

The above video demonstrates three exercises to help strengthen the legs and buttock at ANY age. A simple weight baring squat (chair squat and wall squat also demonstrated), basic lunge (or chair assisted lunge), and pelvic thrust can help to ensure that lower extremity function is maintained. If you are advanced, you can add hand weights and/or a balance element like a Bosu Ball or Foam Balance Trainer into the mix. Always listen to your body and modify the exercises based on your ability.

Don’t forget to leave a comment in the box at the very end of the blog letting us know what you think! 🙂

Video: Wine Tasting With Dr. Stewart

Before popping open your next bottle of wine, watch the above video to learn a few simple steps that will help you enjoy and appreciate the wine that you’re tasting.

In the meantime, here is an easy step by step explanation about how to taste wine, and a link you can go to for all its wonderful health benefits. Cheers!!!

1. Look at the Cork: After opening your bottle, look at the cork and make sure there are no sugar crystals where the wine made contacted the cork, and that the wine hasn’t fully saturated into the cork. This could be an indication that the wine is bad.

2. Aerate the Wine: Three ways to allow the wine to “breathe” include letting the bottle sit open for 30 minutes, pouring the wine into a decanter, or using a bottle top aerator to instantly aerate the wine as you pour.

3. Look at the Wine: Evaluate the wine for clarity, color, and body. If the wine is cloudy, it has likely gone bad. The color should be consistent with the grape the wine is made from. And there should be lines of wine – or “legs” – that streak down the sides of the glass when swirled, indicating good body.

4. Swirl & Sniff: Next swirl the wine in small circles on a table or in the air and then take in the smell of the wine. The swirl further aerates the wine to bring out initial characteristics that you may experience with the first taste.

5. Taste the Wine: Put a small amount of wine on the tongue and hold it there for two to three seconds to rime your taste buds, and feel the initial texture and character of the wine. Then swish or trill the wine in the mouth to experience the full expression of the wine’s texture, character, flavors, and nuances. Trilling means holding the wine on the tongue while breathing air into the mouth so the wine completely opens up on the palate.

6. The Finish: Swallow the wine and see how long the flavors and texture stay in the mouth to evaluate what’s called the “finish” (short, medium, or long).

Enjoy!

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/resveratrol

Video: Rotator Cuff Exercises at Home

The most common, non-spinal sports injury treated in my office is Rotator Cuff Strain. However, this shoulder injury doesn’t only happen during a sporting event. It also occurs after lifting or carrying a heavy object like luggage, or performing landscaping activities. Symptoms can include difficulty lifting the arm away from the body causing pain, discomfort when pulling objects, and/or pain in the shoulder at night when sleeping. The pain is typically sharp and is centered at the top and/or back of the shoulder, and radiates down the side and back of the upper arm.

For easy exercises to do at home for a mild to moderate strain of the Rotator Cuff watch the video above. Always get clearance from your sports chiropractor before starting an exercise program after injury.

Video: Cooking With Dr. Stewart- Vegan Broccoli Cauliflower Soup

Looking for simple, healthy, delicious and nutritious meal ideas? Start with this low-calorie vegan broccoli cauliflower soup. Don’t forget to watch the video above to see how the soup is made from beginning to end! Here is your recipe:

Ingredients (all organic):

6 cups vegetable broth  

2 1/2 cups broccoli florets

1 1/2 cups cauliflower florets

2 slices (approximately 2 loose cups) sourdough bread cut into 2 inch pieces

1 skinned Russet potato cut into 1 inch slices squared

1/2 diced yellow onion

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

sea salt and cracked pepper to taste

Preparation: Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in pan. Add onions and cook until caramelized. Place caramelized onions in a large pot with chopped broccoli, cauliflower, potato, bread and vegetable broth. Cover and bring to boil. Lower heat, season with sea salt and cracked pepper, and allow to simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Transfer all cooked contents into a blender and blend to a smooth consistency. Serve as is, with sourdough toast, and/or a small dollop of creme fresh or sour cream. Additional salt and pepper to taste. Total prep and cook time: 45 min. Makes 4-6 servings

Share your comments below to let me know what you think!

Video: Cooking With Dr. Stewart- Vegan Broccoli Cauliflower Soup

Looking for simple, healthy, delicious and nutritious meal ideas? Start with this low-calorie vegan broccoli cauliflower soup. Don’t forget to watch the video above to see how the soup is made from beginning to end! Here is your recipe:

Ingredients (all organic):

6 cups vegetable broth  

2 1/2 cups broccoli florets

1 1/2 cups cauliflower florets

2 slices (approximately 2 loose cups) sourdough bread cut into 2 inch pieces

1 skinned Russet potato cut into 1 inch slices squared

1/2 diced yellow onion

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

sea salt and cracked pepper to taste

Preparation: Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in pan. Add onions and cook until caramelized. Place caramelized onions in a large pot with chopped broccoli, cauliflower, potato, bread and vegetable broth. Cover and bring to boil. Lower heat, season with sea salt and cracked pepper, and allow to simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Transfer all cooked contents into a blender and blend to a smooth consistency. Serve as is, with sourdough toast, and/or a small dollop of creme fresh or sour cream. Additional salt and pepper to taste. Total prep and cook time: 45 min. Makes 4-6 servings

Share your comments below to let me know what you think!

Video: Working With Back Pain

Back pain diagnoses fall within one of four categories – postural, traumatic, misalignment, or pathological. Postural, as the name implies, is caused by chronic poor posture while standing, sitting, or lying down and improper body positioning during daily activities. Traumatic includes any event that damages the tissues of the low back such as a car accident, falling off a ladder, or sports injury. Misalignment occurs when repetitive stress on the body from poor posture positions or repeated activities force the bones of the spine (and other joints) out of alignment resulting in structural weakness and, ultimately, pain. And finally, pathological back pain is that which is caused by a disease process going on in the body, such as urinary tract disorders, digestive tract disorders, or cancer.  If you are suffering from back pain and seeking to ease the strain between professional chiropractic adjustments, check out the video above for three easy exercises that may help to reduce your symptoms.

Video: How to Stay Healthy Working From Home

As we are all adjusting to working from home, it is important to acknowledge the physical wear and tear that spending eight to twelve hours per day on a computer is taking on our bodies. Sitting with poor posture for extended periods of time WILL cause pain and reduced motion leading to disability of the spine. To prevent deterioration of the neck and back it is crucial that you take frequent breaks, and maintain upright posture to preserve the spinal curves, joints, and muscles. Above is a simple stretching routine for the neck to help relieve some of the nagging pain you may be experiencing. These stretches can be done during brief breaks throughout the day. Click the video to get started and leave your comments below.

Sports Injury Rounds: 14-Year Old Gymnast with Low Back Pain

Depending on the source, gymnastics is considered one of the most dangerous sports.  It is not surprising that many of my sports injury patients come from this community of athletes.  Not surprisingly, back pain is, by far, the most common issue I see in gymnasts.  I recently treated a young athlete with a particular injury that, had it not been properly diagnosed, could have led to catastrophic consequences.

A 14-year old female gymnast entered my office with low back pain that started a month ago after doing a practice session on the balance beam.  The pain was sharp at first but eased up with OTC NSAIDs and rest.  But every time she went back to practicing, her back pain would return.  During our initial consultation, the patient revealed that she occasionally experienced shooting pain down her right leg, but that it doesn’t last very long.  Both the back pain and occasional leg pain would occur only when sleeping on her stomach, standing for long periods, or practicing gymnastics.  Sitting while at school or at home was not irritating.  There was no recent history of other illness.

At this point my differential diagnosis included Herniated Disc with Radiculopathy, Subacute Facet Syndrome with Sciatica, or Spondylolysis with possible Spondylolithesis.  Each of these diagnoses were plausible, however, a focused exam and proper imaging were essential to narrowing down the underlying injury and choosing the correct care path.  An NMS exam also included a postural exam, squat test, and flexibility evaluation.  Positive findings included a slight forward lean while standing, pain in the lumbar spine during a squat, tight hip flexors, pain during P to A palpation of the lumbar spine, positive Yoeman’s Test on the right, and a positive Stork Test bilaterally.  All other tests including Leseagues, Sitting Root Test, and SLR were negative.  All neurological tests were WNL.

It was unlikely that this athlete experienced a herniated disc because all of the space-occupying lesion tests were negative.  Considering the nature of this injury, the length of time the the patient had been experiencing symptoms, and the exam results, imaging was ordered.  Imaging may include x-rays, CT, MRI, or bone scan.  Each of these choices would be diagnostic in this case.  However, due to costs and potential authorization delays related to MRI and CT, I opted to move forward with x-ray as the best initial imaging option.  A good quality 5 view x-ray would reveal if a fractured pars interarticularis and Spondylolisthesis was present.  Alternatively, a bone scan would reveal if active metabolic activity in a fracture site was present.     

As a Sports Chiropractor, it is important to know the mechanisms of injury of all the most common sports.  If you have treated enough gymnasts (or football linemen), certain injuries resulting from repetitive extension of the lumbar spine should come to mind first.  In this case, the final diagnosis was Spondylolysis with a Grade 1 Spodylolisthesis.   With proper wearing of an immobilizing brace (up to 6 months), non-force chiropractic care, and physiotherapeutic modalities, a patient can experience a full recovery from this injury.  Self-care in the form of core strengthening and balance training will be required once it is determined through re-imaging that the area has healed.  In some cases, if the spine doesn’t heal well, or the Spodylolisthesis is severe, surgical consultation for fusion would be required.

Published in ANJC July 2019

Ankle Sprain/Strain- Active vs Passive Care

Often times I get a new patient that wants a second opinion about an ankle sprain/strain that occurred months to years ago. He/she received treatment, yet they are still in pain. Typically, the patient presents with pain after walking for a long period, after running for short distances, or they feel a sense of weakness or instability in the joint. This patient most likely was told to immobilize the ankle until the inflammation and pain subsides, and then go for some form of physical therapy to strengthen the muscles around the ankle.

Unfortunately, this type of outdated advise continues to be provided to patients. The truth is healing from an ankle sprain requires three stages of treatment to fully improve. When the initial evaluation is conducted the practitioner must first determine the severity of the injury- grade I, II, or III with grade I being more of a ligamentous and muscle stretch injury and grade III representing a frank tearing of tissue. For grades I and most grade II strains treatment should commence immediately (grade III strains may require an MRI and then surgery before rehabilitation begins). Initial treatment should incorporate passive treatments such as laser therapy, electric stimulation, and/or ultrasound therapy to control edema and accelerate healing. A slow deep manual flush from the foot up the leg can also be performed to move excess edema. However, scar tissue prevention, which is critical for rapid, complete healing must also be included. This can be achieved by incorporating Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (an external method to scrape early onset scar tissue out of the area of injury), Active Release Technique, and gentile ankle mobilization.

When the injury has started healing and the inflammation has begun to subside (usually day 3-7 after injury) stage 2 of rehabilitation can commence. This stage focuses on laser therapy to provoke cell regeneration, and low impact strengthening and balance training. It is not enough to just strengthen. When ligaments and muscles go through the shock of an injury, these tissues lose their ability to perceive the bodies shift in position reducing a persons ability to stay balanced. Active range of motion of the ankle, slow, one foot toe raises with the shoe on, and low resistance exercise bands should be used. This stage can progress to more challenging exercises as stability is gradually restored. Using a Bosu Ball, or folded towels with shoe off is a good start. By the end of this stage a patient should be pain-free, inflammation-free, and feel confident about using the ankle.

The final stage of rehab involves reintroducing everyday fitness activities to a patient’s lifestyle. Using fitness ladders and jump boxes are just a couple examples of common tools to improve plyometric movements to the ankle. Starting slowly, a patient can reintroduce their favorite exercises back into their life. The total rehab time can be as little as 2 -3 weeks to 2 – 3 months. However, both active and passive forms of care are necessary immediately after injury to ensure full recovery.